Right now

I'm procrastinating on going to sleep. This seems like a nice place. I'd like to feel a connection to people through the internet again, a forgotten feeling.

  • This sounds terrible, but I think I like content more than people. All the best ideas and literature were made by people I probably would have disliked had I met them. It seems that the emotional distance of text and the finality of death make an author's legacy more palatable. The problem is finding stuff that is non-trivial yet still engaging.

    16°
  • >>16
    It's how everyone looks at it. But good communication happens when the people involved are individuals. Removing the differences to make everyone as agreeable as possible generates shallow content.

    17°
  • >>16
    I agree, it seems that most "brilliant" people in all fields are not the greatest people, and are disagreeable/offputting in some, or many, ways. I think you are allowed to enjoy content created by a "bad" person, like we are allowed to use scientific results found by "bad" people, too. We just don't have to financially support them.
    We should also try to surround ourselves with "good" and "normal" people during our downtime, if only just to remind ourselves that "good" and "normal" people still exist, and how to be "good" and "normal". I didn't say *act*, I said *be*. Although I rarely feel a strong connection with these "good" and "normal" people, it's a big relief that the majority of people outside are, for example, willing to help you out in the event of a car accident.
    Spending too much time engaging with or consuming from these "brilliant" insufferable loners is dangerous to me, because I inevitably feel so much more connection with them than "good" and "normal" people. I don't know if I count as a "brilliant" person, but I know that I very slowly become slightly more insufferable as it goes. I do want the world to be full of "brilliant" people, but I want the people walking on the streets to be willing to help me out, if I need it. So I need to watch out and make sure I'm not turning into someone who wouldn't...

    19°
  • >>17
    Certainly. A big trend in narratives these days is that the protagonist has to be satisfy all facets of political correctness. I guess this ups the relatability factor, because these days, young people are all about being PC. I mean I can't really relate to a character who is openly racist, that is for sure, so I can *understand* why this is getting popular.
    Only, now people are afraid to write stories that aren't 100% PC. Of course it is natural and desirable that publishers avoid putting out stories that say "racism is good", but it seems there can be no grey area. If your story mentions racism, it has to explicitly say "racism is bad". I think this is destroying good literature at the moment.
    I am only speaking about YA.

    20°
  • >>19
    I think you misunderstood my comment. I am very much enthusiastic for machine learning to surpass human creatives, just as Dungeon A.I. is doing to text games. But perhaps that is just the logic of capitalism talking through me (at the expense of the worker). Maybe I just have anxiety with a side of misanthropy like most people these days.

    25°
  • >>25
    I sorta understand that sentiment. At the same time, I'm not sure how I feel about AI-generated content. I feel like it's not the same as content made by a human, but there's no reason for me to think that. It's not like I ever think about the creator of a work while consuming it.

    26°
  • >>25
    >I am very much enthusiastic for machine learning to surpass human creatives.
    Yeah that will happen because human creatives are only allowed to make fast food entertainment today.

    27°
  • >>27
    Can't wait to see machine generated fast food entertainment! That's what it'll probably be, for the most part.
    On the other hand, it will make non-fast food entertainment cheaper still.

    30°

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